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After Drive DeVilbiss recalled nearly 500,000 Bed Assist Rails back in December 2021, two other companies also recalled their bed rails. All have received reports of people dying after becoming entrapped between the bed rails and the bed.

Drive DeVilbiss Recalls Nearly 500,000 Bed Rails

On December 6, 2021, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced the recall of about 496,100 Drive DeVilbiss Healthcare Home Bed Assist Handles and Bed Assist Rails. These are made of steel tubing either in white or chrome and include black non-slip padding on the grip handle and under-bed frame.

They were sold at medical supply stores nationwide and at amazon.com and Walmart.com from October 2007 through December 2021 for between $30 and $80.

Drive DeVilbiss initiated the recall after receiving two reports of entrapment deaths associated with two of its bed rails. The deaths occurred in February 2011 and February 2015 and involved a 93-year-old woman at her home in California and a 92-year-old man at an assisted living facility in Canada. In both incidents, the bed rails were not securely attached to the bed and the users became entrapped between the products and their mattress.

Consumers were advised to stop using the bed rails and contact Drive DeVilbiss for a full refund at 877-467-3099 from 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. ET, or online at the company’s recall site.

Essential Medical Recalls Over 270,000 Bed Rails

Later, on December 22, 2021, two other companies initiated similar recalls. Essential Medical Supply recalled about 272,000 Endurance Hand Bed Rails again because users could become trapped between the bed rail and the side of the mattress. This poses a serious entrapment hazard and risk of death by asphyxiation.

These bed rails were sold at medical supply stores nationwide and at Amazon.com and Walmart.com between October 2006 and December 2021 for between $36 and $98. They are made similar to the Drive DeVilbiss bed rails and have the name “Essential Medical Supply, Inc.” on a label located on the grip handle.

At the time of the recall, Essential  Medical Supply was aware of one entrapment death that occurred in December 2012 and involved an 86-year-old man at his home in California. The company advises consumers to stop using the rails immediately and contact the company for a pro-rated refund, depending on the age of the bed rail.

Consumers with older bed rails sold between October 2006 and October 2015 should disassemble and dispose of the rails to prevent reuse.

Compass Health Brands Recalls Over 104,000 Bed Rails

Also on December 22, 2021, Compass Health Brands recalled about 104,900 Carex Bed Support Rails. At the time of the recall, the company was aware of three entrapment deaths associated with these rails.

The deaths occurred between April 2014 and June 2020 and involved an 85-year-old man at an assisted living facility in Ohio; an 84-year-old woman at her home in California; and an 88-year-old woman at an assisted living facility in Washington. In each incident, the bed rail was not securely attached to the bed and the user became entrapped between the product and their mattress.

The name Carex and the model number should be printed on the label on the bottom of the rails. They were sold nationwide and online at carex.com, Amazon.com, and Walmart.com for about $22 and $80 between November 2012 and December 2021.

Consumers should stop using the rails and contact Compass Health Brands for a free repair kit (for the Bed Support Rail) or a refund (for the Easy Up 2-in-1 Bed Rail). Call 888-571-2710 from 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, or online at the company’s recall site.

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